Spring-Summer 2016

Having finished looking at The Power of Myth series we moved onto Mythos I series of lectures by Campbell which addresses some of the most challenging questions:

  1. Psyche and Symbol: The psychological sources of myths and dreams.
  2. The Spirit Land: How a living myth imbues the world with meaning.
  3. On Being Human: The emergence of myth in early hunter-gatherer societies.
  4. From Goddesses to God: The evolution of the concept and personfication of gods.
  5. The Mystical Life: Mythological narratives that helped shape the Western psyche.

 

Winter 2016

The final in a trilogy of symposiums, The Theatre of Change, took place in the Abbey Theatre between the 21st and 23rd of January 2016. The most moving and heart-wrenching presentations were not about Ireland but about the gordian-knot that is the Middle East.

Word Sleuth:

ताराtārā (SKT) - goddess of compassion:-

Taras are goddessess of compassion that are each said to be a personification of a tear of divine compassion. There are references of up to twenty one different taras who are differentiated, in the first instance, by colour. ie. the White Tara, Green Tara etc. It may be noteworthy that in James Joyce's Finnegans Wake, Isabel falls to earth as a singult tear and the names of her twenty eight companions are all colours.
The Sanskrit title has two meanings: saviour and star. In the first sense it derives from the Sanskrit root tr?, which means to cross, traverse (river etc) to transport, surpass or overcome; also to liberate and to escape. In the latin noun ter-minus, boundary, limit, terminal, term the emphasis is shifted, the Roman deity Terminus, presided over boundaries.
The second sense, star, is derived from the Sanskrit root, str?, which means to scatter, expand or spread out and is related to the English star, aster and strew.

Title: The Mythic Image - Authors: Joseph Campbell - Pub: Princeton-Bollingen - ISBN: 0-691-01839-1