Spring-Summer 2016

Having finished looking at The Power of Myth series we moved onto Mythos I series of lectures by Campbell which addresses some of the most challenging questions:

  1. Psyche and Symbol: The psychological sources of myths and dreams.
  2. The Spirit Land: How a living myth imbues the world with meaning.
  3. On Being Human: The emergence of myth in early hunter-gatherer societies.
  4. From Goddesses to God: The evolution of the concept and personfication of gods.
  5. The Mystical Life: Mythological narratives that helped shape the Western psyche.

 

Winter 2016

The final in a trilogy of symposiums, The Theatre of Change, took place in the Abbey Theatre between the 21st and 23rd of January 2016. The most moving and heart-wrenching presentations were not about Ireland but about the gordian-knot that is the Middle East.

Word Sleuth:

*séhaul (PIE) - Sun:-

The word for the Sun is old: Latin sōl sun; English sun; Lithuanian sáulė sun; Greek hēélios; Avestan hvar sun; Sanskrit svàr~ sūr(y)a; the Old Irish cognate sūil means eye, a concept also reprised in both Greek and Indic mythology.
In Eygpt the sun is represented as, N5 , and can also be represented as The Eye of Ra . This is frequently represented in hieroglyphs as the mirror opposite of the more common, Wadjet Eye, D10 , which has lunar associations. Originally the sun and moon were the right and left eyes respectively of Horus as a celestial falcon.
For reference, in China and Japan the basic symbol for the sun is, , and that for the eye,.

Title: The Oxford Introduction to Proto-Indo-European (PIE) - Authors: J.P.Mallory and D.Q.Adams - Pub: Oxford Linguistics - ISBN: 978-0-19-929668-2