Spring-Summer 2016

Having finished looking at The Power of Myth series we moved onto Mythos I series of lectures by Campbell which addresses some of the most challenging questions:

  1. Psyche and Symbol: The psychological sources of myths and dreams.
  2. The Spirit Land: How a living myth imbues the world with meaning.
  3. On Being Human: The emergence of myth in early hunter-gatherer societies.
  4. From Goddesses to God: The evolution of the concept and personfication of gods.
  5. The Mystical Life: Mythological narratives that helped shape the Western psyche.

 

Winter 2016

The final in a trilogy of symposiums, The Theatre of Change, took place in the Abbey Theatre between the 21st and 23rd of January 2016. The most moving and heart-wrenching presentations were not about Ireland but about the gordian-knot that is the Middle East.

Word Sleuth:

dhárma (SKT) - moral duty.:-

In contrast to the oriental idea of marga (SKT) or tao (CH), the Way, there is the more prevalent, and constraining, notion of dhárma, or moral duty. In India this idea depends on a person's age, class, occupation, and gender.
It is a derivation from Proto-Indo-Iranian root *dhar- ("to fasten, to support, to hold"), in turn reflecting Proto-Indo-European root *dher- ("to hold"). Etymologically it is related to Avestan √dar- ("to hold"), Old Persian √dar-("to hold, have"), Latin frēnum ("rein, horse tack"), Lithuanian derė́ti ("to be suited, fit") and Lithuanian dermė (agreement), darna ("harmony").
Further east in China and Japan the best equivalent would probably be the character for law,. In Japanese this can be used to denote the Budda's Law, 仏法 (bupou) or secular law, 法 律 (houritsu). The character combines water (three dashes on left) with container and has connotations of watertight container. This notion was extended to mean restraint of human behavior and is also found for instance in the word for grammar, 文法 (bunpou).
(Rather nullifying the above line of thought, in Oriental Mythology p23-5, J.Campbell equates dhárma with Tao as a conception of how the universe works.

And as the Tao Te Ching has said of the tao, so say the Indians of dhárma: its yonder side is beyond definition; its hither side is the mother, support and bearer of all things.

Title: A Guide to Remembering Japanese Characters - Authors: Kenneth G. Henshall - Pub: Charles E.Tuttle Company - ISBN: 4-8053-0509-6
Title: The Masks of God - Oriental Mythology - Authors: Joseph Campbell - Pub: Arkana - ISBN: 0-14-019442-8
Title: Wikipedia Articles - Authors: Various - Pub: Wikipedia, - ISBN: n/a