Spring-Summer 2016

Having finished looking at The Power of Myth series we moved onto Mythos I series of lectures by Campbell which addresses some of the most challenging questions:

  1. Psyche and Symbol: The psychological sources of myths and dreams.
  2. The Spirit Land: How a living myth imbues the world with meaning.
  3. On Being Human: The emergence of myth in early hunter-gatherer societies.
  4. From Goddesses to God: The evolution of the concept and personfication of gods.
  5. The Mystical Life: Mythological narratives that helped shape the Western psyche.

 

Winter 2016

The final in a trilogy of symposiums, The Theatre of Change, took place in the Abbey Theatre between the 21st and 23rd of January 2016. The most moving and heart-wrenching presentations were not about Ireland but about the gordian-knot that is the Middle East.

Word Sleuth:

*mélit (PIE) - honey:-

The PIE noun for honey mélit is mil in Old Irish, mel in Latin, miel in French, melr in Armenian, militt in ancient Hittite and Greek méli. The Chinese word for honey mi - 蜜 is thought to be borrowed from the Proto-Tocharian mit. The name Melissa means Honey Bee in Greek
A cave painting in Valencia Spain, depicts a honey harvester with bees swarming around in Cueve de la Arana (cave of the spider) dating from circa 13,000 BCE.

Title: The Oxford Introduction to Proto-Indo-European (PIE) - Authors: J.P.Mallory and D.Q.Adams - Pub: Oxford Linguistics - ISBN: 978-0-19-929668-2