Fairy Tale Collections Online

For those searching for a particular fairy tale for entertainment or a project there are thousands of them to be found online.

Title Author
Folklore and Fairy Tales: The A to Z of (University of Pittsburgh - Folklore) Professor D. L. Ashliman
Grimm's Household Tales Vol.1 (Wikisource) Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm
Hans Christian Anderson Tales (Wikisource) Hans Christian Anderson
Irish Fairy Tales (Project Gutenberg) James Stephens
Japanese Fairy Tales (Project Gutenberg) Yei Theodora Ozaki
Metamorphoses (Wikisource) Ovid
Respository of Irish fairy tales and folklore (The 1930s Schools' Project) Irish School Children (1930s)
Russian Fairy Tales (Moscow) (Project Gutenberg) William Ralston Shedden-Ralston
The Book of a Thousand and One Nights (Wikisource) Richard F.Burton
One to Nine of Nine Collections
Word Sleuth:

ताराtārā (SKT) - goddess of compassion:-

Taras are goddessess of compassion that are each said to be a personification of a tear of divine compassion. There are references of up to twenty one different taras who are differentiated, in the first instance, by colour. ie. the White Tara, Green Tara etc. It may be noteworthy that in James Joyce's Finnegans Wake, Isabel falls to earth as a singult tear and the names of her twenty eight companions are all colours.
The Sanskrit title has two meanings: saviour and star. In the first sense it derives from the Sanskrit root tr?, which means to cross, traverse (river etc) to transport, surpass or overcome; also to liberate and to escape. In the latin noun ter-minus, boundary, limit, terminal, term the emphasis is shifted, the Roman deity Terminus, presided over boundaries.
The second sense, star, is derived from the Sanskrit root, str?, which means to scatter, expand or spread out and is related to the English star, aster and strew.

Title: The Mythic Image - Authors: Joseph Campbell - Pub: Princeton-Bollingen - ISBN: 0-691-01839-1